Pondering The Death of Print

Pondering The Death of Print

This is the first time I have ever attempted to make a comic, and though I am fairly inept at drawing, I really didn’t want to use someone else’s artwork to represent my words. I used original photos, my own stick figure drawings, and one screen capture of an app. (Pippi!) in order to put this together. The IPad apps. I used include Penultimate, Photo Notes, and ComicBookFx.

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11 thoughts on “Pondering The Death of Print

  1. Your comic is pretty funny Megan. I love that you took digital pictures of your most beloved books and included them in your comic. It really does relate the importance of both digital and print. Nice job!

    • Thank you! I wasn’t sure if the humor would translate the way I had intended. I think that it will be a while before digital replaces print, even on the most basic level. Digital books are just so boring (unless you are looking at an online comic or children’s book). I imagine it will take time for digital books to realize their potential and stylistically outperform printed books.

  2. I liked that you used only original photos! I felt won over by this article when the author argued the point of saving trees with less books being printed.

    • I must admit I am a little torn. My brain jumps back and forth between “save the trees!” And “but I love my books…” The nice thing is that in the long run there will probably be much more impressive online books, and a nice balance between digital and print that will (mostly) satisfy everyone. I really am excited to see how things change even in the next few years with regards to this issue.

  3. Great comic, Meg. I’m still a bit divided on my feelings for digital vs. print books, but there is always a lingering love-affair feeling from my books. I wonder if this is a materialistic thing, of if there really is something inherently more “personable” about printed books. This is especially true when I read a book that’s been put together with a bit of technique–margins sized to easily accommodate thumbs, a typeface that serves the story well, paper, binding, etc., etc.. But I still am growing to love the ebook, even in it’s basic form. There’s something so expedient about being able to instantly look up an unfamiliar word, or annotate without worrying about margin space or sloppy handwriting. The biggest one for me, though, is the searchable type aspect. Especially in conjunction with school readings, this has been indispensable to me.

    • For me, books are just like stamps are to a stamp collector. Yes, it is materialistic in some way, but it is also a hobby (obsession!) and a fun thing to look for at used book stores or antique shops. The smell of old books should be gross, since we know that it is just dead skin cells and oils from other people – but it is one of my favorite smells in the world. Perhaps I am just a sentimental schmuck. 🙂

      Digital books are fairly unsophisticated and generic as of yet, but I imagine even that will change over time. I’m with you though – annotation and word look-up are the most helpful part of online books! It kills me to write in books, so at least with a digital copy I can annotate without guilt and hesitation.

      I guess I am at the point where I am excited about the future, but believe that it’s unnecessary to completely wipe out the past in order to get there.

  4. I appreciate your take on the digital vs. print book debate. I’m ambivalent, but lean towards the digital. I see value in print books that are rare or favorites. Otherwise, I’m fine with digital books in formless content. And your stick figure, like Carrie’s hand-drawn cartoon, is so adorable.

    • Thanks Vone, I drew my stick-figure using my finger because I was having issues not messing it up with a stylus (it sounds backwards, I know). I don’t completely hate digital, I think they are doing amazing things with children’s books that makes some of them infinitely more interactive than print versions. I think they should work a little harder on making digital books for adults that aren’t just words thrown onto a screen. It just doesn’t cut it visually for me…at least not enough to buy an e-book versus a print book. I’m sure I will be changing my tune here in a few years when things get a little more sophisticated, but until then, I will stick with the print version.

  5. Was really glad to have the account of the various apps you used. I’ve actually never used any of those. I’m glad you went out on a limb. Sometimes the meat of the work is in the way you approach the tools, but I actually think your stick figures (I promise I can’t draw any better) are exactly right. They feel tactile and hand-drawn, in stark contrast to the computer drawn graphics of the app.

  6. Meg(an) (which do you prefer?)
    I laughed so hard at that last frame! But what I really loved about your comic is that it isn’t necessary to choose only print or only digital because each has their inherent value. I find it fascinating that human beings want to compare the two media, or say “hey child, don’t play with that iPad when you could be reading a book.” I think of two as separate activities. But I wonder what makes so many of us gravitate toward electronics over analog life?

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Pondering The Death of Print

Pondering The Death of Print

This is the first time I have ever attempted to make a comic, and though I am fairly inept at drawing, I really didn’t want to use someone else’s artwork to represent my words. I used original photos, my own stick figure drawings, and one screen capture of an app. (Pippi!) in order to put this together. The IPad apps. I used include Penultimate, Photo Notes, and ComicBookFx.

11 thoughts on “Pondering The Death of Print

  1. Your comic is pretty funny Megan. I love that you took digital pictures of your most beloved books and included them in your comic. It really does relate the importance of both digital and print. Nice job!

    • Thank you! I wasn’t sure if the humor would translate the way I had intended. I think that it will be a while before digital replaces print, even on the most basic level. Digital books are just so boring (unless you are looking at an online comic or children’s book). I imagine it will take time for digital books to realize their potential and stylistically outperform printed books.

  2. I liked that you used only original photos! I felt won over by this article when the author argued the point of saving trees with less books being printed.

    • I must admit I am a little torn. My brain jumps back and forth between “save the trees!” And “but I love my books…” The nice thing is that in the long run there will probably be much more impressive online books, and a nice balance between digital and print that will (mostly) satisfy everyone. I really am excited to see how things change even in the next few years with regards to this issue.

  3. Great comic, Meg. I’m still a bit divided on my feelings for digital vs. print books, but there is always a lingering love-affair feeling from my books. I wonder if this is a materialistic thing, of if there really is something inherently more “personable” about printed books. This is especially true when I read a book that’s been put together with a bit of technique–margins sized to easily accommodate thumbs, a typeface that serves the story well, paper, binding, etc., etc.. But I still am growing to love the ebook, even in it’s basic form. There’s something so expedient about being able to instantly look up an unfamiliar word, or annotate without worrying about margin space or sloppy handwriting. The biggest one for me, though, is the searchable type aspect. Especially in conjunction with school readings, this has been indispensable to me.

    • For me, books are just like stamps are to a stamp collector. Yes, it is materialistic in some way, but it is also a hobby (obsession!) and a fun thing to look for at used book stores or antique shops. The smell of old books should be gross, since we know that it is just dead skin cells and oils from other people – but it is one of my favorite smells in the world. Perhaps I am just a sentimental schmuck. 🙂

      Digital books are fairly unsophisticated and generic as of yet, but I imagine even that will change over time. I’m with you though – annotation and word look-up are the most helpful part of online books! It kills me to write in books, so at least with a digital copy I can annotate without guilt and hesitation.

      I guess I am at the point where I am excited about the future, but believe that it’s unnecessary to completely wipe out the past in order to get there.

  4. I appreciate your take on the digital vs. print book debate. I’m ambivalent, but lean towards the digital. I see value in print books that are rare or favorites. Otherwise, I’m fine with digital books in formless content. And your stick figure, like Carrie’s hand-drawn cartoon, is so adorable.

    • Thanks Vone, I drew my stick-figure using my finger because I was having issues not messing it up with a stylus (it sounds backwards, I know). I don’t completely hate digital, I think they are doing amazing things with children’s books that makes some of them infinitely more interactive than print versions. I think they should work a little harder on making digital books for adults that aren’t just words thrown onto a screen. It just doesn’t cut it visually for me…at least not enough to buy an e-book versus a print book. I’m sure I will be changing my tune here in a few years when things get a little more sophisticated, but until then, I will stick with the print version.

  5. Was really glad to have the account of the various apps you used. I’ve actually never used any of those. I’m glad you went out on a limb. Sometimes the meat of the work is in the way you approach the tools, but I actually think your stick figures (I promise I can’t draw any better) are exactly right. They feel tactile and hand-drawn, in stark contrast to the computer drawn graphics of the app.

  6. Meg(an) (which do you prefer?)
    I laughed so hard at that last frame! But what I really loved about your comic is that it isn’t necessary to choose only print or only digital because each has their inherent value. I find it fascinating that human beings want to compare the two media, or say “hey child, don’t play with that iPad when you could be reading a book.” I think of two as separate activities. But I wonder what makes so many of us gravitate toward electronics over analog life?

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